HOME

ALMANACH

ORDER

BIO

CONTACT

 
ELEMENTS



 

IRON
EARTH






THE FIVE ELEMENTS

The five Chinese elements are known in Tibetan as jugwa: Wood (shing), Fire (Me), Earth (Sa), Metal (chak), and Water (Chu). They are natural forces of transformation, in constant interaction with each other. The term "element" is to be understood as dynamic principle, a principle of energy; and certain authors prefer to speak of "agents" rather than the more confusing "elements". The names of elements Wood, Fire, Earth, Water, and Metal are symbolic: they allow description of the elements by analogy, but have little to do with the objects of the same name. None of the elements is good or bad in itself. However, in contact with each other they react according to their affinities. There are therefore favorable, neutral, and harmful relations. An element can also become dangerous when there is too much or too little of it. Each of the elements embraces a number of meanings and correspondences: each has inherent characteristics, activity, direction, season, planet, organ, etc. These allow the nature of each element to be defined, but it must not be forgotten that the elements never exist in isolation: they are dynamic and in constant interaction. The essence of the five elements is said to be unique because they are all a manifestation of pure cosmic energy.

Element
Symbol
Color
Direction
Quality
Period
Activity
Organ
Planet and Parkha
Wood
Tree
Green
East
Spring
Dawn
Vitality
Mobility
Liver
Jupiter
Tsin, Zön
Fire
Flames
Red
South
Summer
Midday
Ardor
Destruction
Heart
Sun, Mars
Li
Earth
Square
Yellow
Center
Interseasonal
Afternoon
Fertility
Solidification
Spleen
Saturn
Khön
Metal
Sword
White
West
Autumn
Evening
Rigidity
Cutting
Lung
Venus
Da
Water
Waves
Blue-black
North
Winter
Night
Rest
Impregnation
Kidneys
Mercury
Moon
Kham

(Philippe Cornu, Tibetan Astrologie, ed. SHAMBHALA)